Nigella Sativa/ Black Cumin (20 seeds)

Nigella Sativa/ Black Cumin (20 seeds)

Rootbox

Nigella Sativa/ Black Cumin (20 seeds)

R 29.99

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Nigella Sativa, also commonly known as the fennel flower and black cumin, is native to south and southwest Asia. Nigella blooms beautifully in the summer with blue, pink or white flowers and have feathery leaves. When the fruit forms, it is a capsule that contains many seeds. These seeds are often used as a spice and Middle Eastern cuisines. The black seeds taste like a combination of onions, black pepper, nutmeg and oregano. They have a pungent, bitter taste and smell. When the seeds are dry roasted; they flavour curries, vegetables and bread products in some cultures. They are used part of a spice mixture panch phoron (which means mixture of five spices) and most recognisably in Naan bread. Nigella is also used in Armenian string cheese, a braided string cheese called majdouleh or majdouli in the Middle East.

Black cumin is often described as a “miracle herb.” Traditionally, black cumin has been utilised for immune-system support, digestive health, respiratory ailments, kidney and liver support, heart health and general well-being. In Asian and the Middle Eastern countries, these seeds are used for the treatment of bronchitis, asthma, rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. A solution of the seeds has also been used to treat indigestion, loss of appetite, diarrhea, parasitic infections and skin ailments. Black cumin has at least 20 of pharmacological actions that have been supported by science. Some of these include:

  • Anti-diabetic
  • Anti- Cancer
  • Immuno-modulator
  • Analgesic
  • Anti-microbial
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Spasmolytic
  • Bronchodilator
  • Hepato-protective
  • Renal-protective
  • Gastro-protective
  • Anti-oxidant properties

How to grow Nigella

Nigella is very easy to grow and love sunny areas. They are also able to survive mild winters and frosts.

  • Sow seeds in rows 30cm X 30cm and gently press them into the surface. Note: Nigella blooms for a few weeks so it is best to sow seeds two or three times from late spring to early summer.
  • Soil must have good draininage, temperature at 21˚C and must be kept moist until germination (in 1-2 weeks).
  • When the pods begin to brown, clip them off and hang them in small bunches to dry.

How to use Black Cumin

For Culinary use, the seeds can be harvested by placing the pods in a paper bag. Allow the pods to dry out completely, thereafter, rub the paper bag in your hands to release the black cumin seeds. Then cut the corner of the bag and retrieve the seeds by using a sieve. The seeds need to be completely dried and stored in an airtight container. These seeds can be added to many dishes. A delicious seasoning can be made when they are mixed in with lemon, cilantro and tahini.

Try adding seeds in your tea or coffee and also in baked goods such as bread and pastries.

Make black cumin tea pouring hot water over approximately one tablespoon seeds. Let it steep for 10 minutes and enjoy.

During cold and flu season, especially when you feel as if you are coming down with something, you can make a powerful tonic with black cumin seeds to boost immunity and soothe coughs.

Mix equal parts of black cumin, garlic and honey with a cup of water. Bring to boil for 5 minutes and let it cool.

References​

  • https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/01/25/black-cumin-seed-benefits